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last updated 27-Mar-2016
 
 
 
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New Zealand is a small country with a proportional representation in the international security labor market. However, the democratic and legislative process of New Zealand makes the country a noteworthy case study, as it illustrates what other countries should be doing in terms of private security and military regulation, as well as the banning of mercenary activities. CLICK HERE to return to the Frequently Consulted Documents page.
 
NEW ZEALAND
 
 

 

Mercenary Activities (Prohibition) Bill 2003. As reported from the Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade Committee (Bill 2004 No 83-2). Wellington, New Zealand, The Parliamentary Library (Published under the authority of the House of Representatives), 15 April 2004. The Bill will enable New Zealand to accede to the International Convention against the Recruitment, Use, Financi ng and Training of Mercenaries 1989 by creating various offences in relation to activities involving mercenaries. Under the Convention, States Parties must criminalise the conduct of persons who recruit, use, finance, or train mercenaries and of those who participate as mercenaries in combat during an armed conflict or in a concerted act of violence. These activities are currently not punishable under New Zealand law: PDF (Summary from Bills Digest No. 1029, as the Bill is now an Act, see link below)

Legislative history of the Mercenary Bill - Selections
15 October 2003
Introduction (Bill 83–1)
5 November 2003
First Reading and referral to Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade Committee. Parliament of New Zealand, Wellington, New Zealand, Hansard debates, vol. 613, p 9769, 5 November 2003: TEXT
11 May-1 July 2004
Second Reading. Parliament of New Zealand, Wellington, New Zealand, Hansard debates: TEXT (11 May 2004, Hansards debates, vol. 617, p 12827) | TEXT (29 June 2004, Hansards debates, vol. 618, p. 14235) | TEXT (1 July 2004, Hansards debates, vol. :618, p. 14199)
29 June 2004
In Committee, Third Reading. Parliament of New Zealand, Wellington, New Zealand, Hansard debates: TEXT (29 June 2004, Hansards debates, vol. 618, p.14249)
3 September 2004
Mercenary Activities (Prohibition) Act Commencement Order 2004. (2004/270): Mercenary Activities (Prohibition) Act 2004 brought into force, on 22 October 2004, by the Mercenary Activities (Prohibition) Act Commencement
Order 2004 (SR 2004/270).

 

Mercenary Activities (Prohibition) Act 2004. Public Act 2004 No 69. The purpose of this Act is to implement in New Zealand law
New Zealand’s obligations under the Mercenaries Convention. Date of assent 6 July 2004; this Act comes into force on a date to be appointed by the Governor-General by Order in Council. Wellington, New Zealand, The Parliamentary Library, 1 July 2013 reprint: TEXT | PDF


DOMESTIC REGULATION

Private Security Personnel and Private Investigators Act 2010. Public Act 2010 No 115. The purpose of this Act is to ensure that persons offering specified private security and investigation services for hire, and personnel providing those services. Persons who must hold licence. The following persons must hold a licence under this Act: (a) a private investigator, (b) a security technician, (c) a security consultant, (d) a confidential document destruction agent, (e) a property guard, (f) a personal guard, (g) a crowd controller. Date of assent 20 September 2010; this Act came into force on 1 April 2011. Wellington, New Zealand, The Parliamentary Library, 1 July 2013 reprint: TEXT | PDF

Private Security Personnel and Private Investigators (Code of Conduct—Surveillance of Individuals) Regulations 2011. Order in Council At Wellington this 28th day of March 2011. The code imposes requirements on private investigators and private investigator employees when undertaking surveillance of an individual. These regulations came into force on 1 April 2011: PDF

 

Private security associations of New Zealand and other countries are listed in the SECURITY INDUSTRY page
 
 
 
 

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